Glass doors explained – What types of doors should you choose for your home

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Glass doors explained – What types of doors should you choose for your home

On August 15, 2016, Posted by , in Renovating, With Comments Off on Glass doors explained – What types of doors should you choose for your home

Glass doors, who can resist the allure of a beautiful sheet of clean glass? Glass transforms, enriches and lets a house be touch with its surroundings like no other material can. They are the main source of natural light to many buildings and are often real talking points. But which type of glass door is best for you? I take a look at few types and their pros and cons.

Single hinged doors are the most traditional form of glass door with a hinge located on one side allowing this type of door to be opened inwards or outwards depending on the requirements. They can be framed or frameless with large, unframed glass looking very elegant indeed. These doors really come into their own when there is no room to install sliding or folding doors as they only need the width of the door in clear space to the front of the door.

With the advent of open plan design, came the rise of the bifold door. These are comprised of a several door panels joined with concertina type hinges that fold along a track. The real beauty of bifolds is that they give an illusion of space as there is no need for additional posts to be used in the opening. They can be nearly completely hidden from view when fully open giving you the most use of all available space. Companies such as Brio, make high quality bifold doors using the best materials. Their range suits virtually all tastes and architectural applications with many leading architects and designers using the doors in their buildings.

Brio also makes a great range of large sliding doors that can be used to really maximise views to the outdoors. Sliding doors allow a large expanse of glass to be easily moved by rolling on sliding door tracks. These often heavy glass doors are fully supported both top and bottom at all times minimising the effort required to open the doors.

Pivot doors use hinges at the bottom and top of each individual door to enable the door to be opened at specific angles – which can be great for directing air flow through a building. They can used on their own or in multiples to good effect and are generally quite large and heavy so do require solid supporting structures above and below the doors.

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